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that is true. if you are a small government conservative in the wilderness for a year when all of these conservatives opted not to run for president, conservatives that movement conservatives who did run the republican nomination, didn't do well. you lost on november 6 a month ago today. you had to deal with the bad republican hand on the fiscal cliff now for better part of a month. this is something to look forward to. that you have two republicans leading the party of this stature and capability. who are movement conservatives in the sense they're both intellectuals. to get these issues viscerally this is something to put you in a good mood. >> bret: rubio talked about the middle class. ryan talked about lifting people out of poverty. different messages than we heard on the campaign trail this past year. >> rub row also seemed to be sort of disagreeing with mitt romney's argument a little bit. the 47% people who just want hand-outs. kind of a thing. which he disagreed with before. it's interesting because i think it's reprehensible message. i also, i wonder where jeb bush fit
strand in the wilderness because they followed the apple map directions. >> we want to thank all of you for making the share your holiday food drive a great success. >> you donated more than $22,000 to bay area food banks yesterday, translating to food for 70,000 people. >> our share your holiday food drive continues through december 31. you can donate. 1-877-37 mr. the need is as great as it has ever been. >> absolutely. we saw major changes. sandy warned us it would be cold. >> we are shivering! >> i know. you will be shivering again tomorrow morning. we are looking at frost advisories overnight tonight. let me show you a live picture. the temperatures dropped down below freezing in some of our inland valleys. and weare heading out in towards another night of chill. a live picture from emeryville. you can see a few cloud there is. moisture from yesterday's system, heated by the sun. and the result has been -- check out the live doppler 7 hd, a few showers have developed between gilroy and holister. we have moisture on mt. st. helena. you can see from gilroy towards holister, we have i
version with gene wilder. >> that won seven oscars. >> the new is kind of creepy. >> johnny depp. >> what are did a stranger break down your door and give you for christmas? >> that's creepy. >> a kindle, a nook, an ipad? the man who ran the fcc on this thing we call the internet was born. the claims are a click away. maybe more than a click, but i think you get the drift. sometimes what we suffer from is bigger than we think ... like the flu. with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unusual behavior, stop taking tamiflu and ca
have spent decades in the wilderness and he was the one that found a way to bring them into the majority in the house. how do you balance the pluses and minuses? >> there is not any question that that effort to paint a picture of jim wright's service laid the foundation for a majority. that was a healthy thing. i do not believe it was a good thing -- we have been in that for far too long. appropriations committees work is where either you spend money or you do not. ideally, you are here to work with one another to be as responsive as possible to your own constituents and taxpayers. within the committee itself, the more we can talk to each other as individuals and human beings, the better off the institution will be. >> the kinds of organizations that track members' votes, when they look at yours, saw an ad and earlier you more frequently crossed the aisle to vote with democrats. in your later service, 96% rating. is that reflective -- you tell me. did the house change? >> it is a reflection of polarization that takes place at a leadership level. party loyalty is importa
are on the way, but there's voices in the wilderness pushing for a flat tax. any hope of reviving tax simplification when it all just seems to be getting more complex? up next, steve forbes, chairman and editor-in-chief of forbes media joining us. ♪ and aantao boot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a stomer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. d#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the newglobal ac, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around t world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-252550 and i'm in total control because i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 rkets in their lal currencies. tdd#: 1-800-5-2550 use their global research to get an edge. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 their equity ratings show me how schwab tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rates specific foreign stocks tdd#: 1-800-345-50 and i also have access to inindependent tdd#: 1-800-342550 firms like nedavis resear
. they don't actually have one, and you watch the wilderness lap for a while. >> you know, candy, i hate to say this because i know we want to play along for 2016, but i think part of the problem in washington is everyone is so focused on the next election it's always an excuse not to get something done. i think the american people think we just went through an election. now please now that you all have jobs, could we actually solve problems and get something done? you know, 2016 will be here way too soon, and people, to your point, are already running for office on both sides, but honestly, i wish people would remember whatever party they're in, you got elected this time a month ago to do a job, and there's a big job to do. >> washington is so dysfunctional. only washington, d.c. is talking about 2016. the rest of the country is trying to create jobs. they're trying to get their kids off to school. they're trying to make payments on their house and car. washington 2016 completely out of touch. >> i know you attended the dinner i was unable to go to. there was some mention of people on t
're finishing your masters and on track to do that. your thesis on wilderness for amp tees and you'll get another masters when you graduate this summer. you said another masters in social work. what do you wanted to do? >> what i'm most interested in doing is what my thesis resolves around and that's getting out in the field in natural areas and helping other people with disabilities. emotionally, physically and spiritually. >> do you have moments when you think, you know, i can't do this? you know, those moments in the middle of the night where you say, this just isn't fair? >> sure, yeah. i have really hard moments, definitely. when things aren't going right or a lot of times if i'm by myself, i can't get to something. and i think it's really necessary to fully experience those moments of grooet, of just absolute exhaustion, and to experience them, accept them, allow them to pass. and over the horizon there's always more sunshine and more love. >> tonight at the celebrating wonderful women fund-raiser, you're honored, the woman of the year. you are such a beacon of home and inspiration
on the wealthy 65% to 31%. republicans, i think they're in the wilderness. they face a changing demographical situation in this country they don't know how to deal with. they've not dealt with women's issues properly and they have ignored immigration reform. it's time for the republicans to take a page out of the "ed show" and let's get to work. i'm joined tonight by congressman jim clyburn of south carolina and also eugene robinson, msnbc political analyst and associate editor and pulitzer prize winning columnist for "washington post" but most of all i can title them both as two distinguished gentlemen from south carolina. gentlemen, good to have you with us tonight. congressman, you first. is the congress -- >> thank you so much. >> is the congress better or worse off with a guy like jim demint? >> well, i wouldn't put it that way, ed. i think that jim is a very principled guy. i never agreed with a single one of his principles, but he's a very principled guy. he is doing what he thinks he needs to do in order to further his cause. he has had some real serious problems with his relationship
. >> yes! >> yes come. >> tvoice wilderness defending the alien senate. >> hang on to my peeps over here come on. you're right about pa. part of it. you can say and put rand paul and cruz in this right wing ideological death trap, but the fact of the matter is, there's a whole new dynamic that's going to come, that's going to unfold in the senate, largely around the point that was just made. when you've got cruz working with the nrc he's got to keep in mind the goal is to elect senators. you cannot come in with this doctrinaire point of view and applying that across the country. not every senate race is the same. they're not equal. you have to be much more measured and balanced. ann coulter is right. i've been saying it for a long time. the party has to get in the real. you got your clocks cleaned. step back and assess how you move forward and take your brand, rejuvenate it. you don't have to dumb down your values, walk away from your principles, but make them relevant to the conversation that the country wants to have with this administration and with the leadership in the house and the
to be able to bring the bodies from the wilderness. it's out in the middle of nowhere. >> shepard: somebody took a photo of what appears to be jenni rivera's driver's license found in the wreckage. abc news confirms she was talking with that network about staring in a sitcom. she allegedly won a couple of mexican billboard awards. she sold 15 million records throughout her career. [ music ] >> shepard: tonight her fans and family say they just can't believe this has happened and they're remembering a woman who often sang about her own troubles and setbacks and helped ease the pain of others along the way. trace gallagher in our west coast news hub this afternoon. jenni rivera got a late start on her career, trace. >> reporter: and really never dreamed she would be a star. she had the first of her five children at the age of 16 years old, and she never put out her first album until she was 30 years old, but over the past 13 years, her very honest ballads about her personal trouble including three failed marriages really struck a nerve with her fans. she also sang about mexican culture, the d
a congressional set. spent ten years in the political wilderness -- >> i want to bring in andrea mitchell, and andrea, what are you hear being susan rice withdrawing her name? >> i think this had become sort of an impossible challenge for her to be confirmed, she realized that, the white house realized it as well. i think they know they are on good political solid ground. this is not going to help republicans at all, the fact that a woman and a woman of color has been forced out of a confirmation process even before she was nominated. she clearly was the president's choice, but i think what happened is that it became untenable, that they began to look through the critics all sorts of other aspects of her background, her finances, the kinds of things that would normally come out in a confirmation but she didn't have the defense, the group around her that you would have if you were the nominee from the white house if you had been vetted and had that whole array of defenses. she was on her own really and left hanging. >> andrea, is there any indication there was pressure from the administrat
conservative wilderness. but it matters what they do. look at jared bernstein put together today. you know they just revised the number for economic growth for the country for the last quarter. they just revised it today. and it was a good revision. it was a revision upwards. so the third quarter, this last quarter this year we were growing at a rate of 3.1%. it's up almost two points from the quarter before. if they don't get their act together, this is what the congressional budget office says is going to happen to the economic growth rate this quarter. 2%. and look what happens next quarter, the first three months of next year. that's bad. maybe as hourtd dean was saying with ed tonight, maybe we can endure that and we'll come back stronger than ever. but that's bad. that is an economic catastrophe that will hurt a lot of americans for a long time. and maybe you want to bear that brunt. but maybe that happening accidentally because of so much chaos on one side that they can't tell which way's up, which way's down and who's on their own side is not the way to get that. this is like being
of order" and tlc's "breaking amish" have also focused on the wilder side of amish life. >> it a controversial concept, and reality feeds on controversy. it's outrageous. it's mysterious. it's unexpected. >> reporter: the network's website acknowledges most of the show is re-enactments, but according to levi, all the stories are the god's honest truth. linsey davis, abc news, new york. >> hope you caught that last word re-enactment. so you're not actually watching it. but they insist the stories are true. but you're not actually watching it unfold. >> it's reality, it's rob's reality with lebanon levi in your household, isn't it? >> that's what i'm talking about. now we're talking. >> who are you paying for a hit? who are you taking out? >> taking out willis, clearly. he's talking trash about the giants/saints game. >> i would just like an italian sausage, please. did you see the sign? i'm hungry. >>> when we -- when we come back, he's back in "the skinny." >> coming up on "world news now." ♪ >>> willis is back. can you tell? >>> willis is back. can you tell? here we g
plans to turn the land into a marine wilderness area, and as a result, the oyster company and 30 employees are out of work. kevin is the owner of drake's bay and now suing for an injunction to keep his business open. good morning to you, kevin. >> good morning, gretchen. how are you? >> gretchen: doing just fine. thank you for getting up so early. so tell me what you've been doing for all these years, your oyster farm. >> the oyster farm is really kind of a main stay in our community. we produce about a third of the oysters grown in the state of california. we get about 50,000 visitors a year who love this place, been here for over eight decades and the community and our county and san francisco bay area loves ush washington, d.c. >> gretchen: so the interior department wants to shut you down. why? >> well, actually a small handful of folks who are really wilderness activists who care deeply about getting people off the land, i think is the best we can tell, want to give up something to create a humanless landscape and it's a little strange because national sea shore was created
. lots of directions ead people to be stranded in the wilderness . 40 miles from desired destinations. already a number of high-profile executives at apple have left. dagen: you can seriously get lost. it is dangerous. twitter and instagram have broken up. instagram pulled all of its images from twitter last night. they are no longer instantly visible. you can still see them, but you have to click on a direct link as opposed to automatically see the photo. the founder of instagram says they wanted to take photo previews off of twitter to drive traffic back to their own site. of course, instagram is owned by facebook. connell: you think it is annoying when 1% doesn't stop talking or just keeps getting up on the airline. talking through the safety demonstration. they do not like it when you do that. complaining about the lack of space in the overhead department. stuffing too much in the overhead compartment. oh, no, no, no. clicking people's fingers to get a flight attendant attentioo, which is annoying on or off the plane. dagen: that is obnoxious. i have caught myself doing that. hey,
. it added wilderness protection to over 2 million acres, it designates 1,100 miles of wild and scenic rivers, added more than 2,800 miles to the national trail system, and i was proud to be part of the effort to enact that legislation. finally, i'll make a few comments on the way that we in the congress conduct our own business. any fair assessment has to conclude that in this area we have lost ground in the last two decades. public opinion of the performance of congress is at an all-time low, and it is not hard to see why. i'll mention three obvious wears in which the functioning of congress has worsened. first is the willingness of some in congress to shut down the government. in 1995 we saw the leadership of the house of representatives demonstrate that they considered refusing to fund the government as an acceptable bargaining ploy in that efforts to prevail in disputes with president clinton and democrats on spending issues. since 1995, that think th threao withhold appropriations has been made several more times, and as we saw then, shuttlin shutting e government is harmful, wasteful t
about the romney campaign. fred wilder asks i wonder if lynn sweet is a cubs or white sox fan. inquiring minds want to know. >> you're on the spot. >> i'm going to try to make this -- >> bill: don't straddle the fence. >> i'm going to tell you i went back to the cubs once "the chicago tribune" sold them. so my allegiance once "the tribune" bought them many years ago and i was in washington. the nats weren't here yet. it was the os. nats were the nats which still have a prime place in my heart but once "the tribune" company bought the cubs, i could go back. once they sold the cubs -- >> bill: you could go back to the cubs. i think that makes sense. >> i had to and i could not -- somebody might say why not go to the white sox. i will quickly tell you the answer. many years ago the white sox did a deal in springfield illinois, the capital where they got -- i thought it was under the radar deal to get funding for their new stadium. and i don't like under the radar deals so i couldn't go to them because that wa
's not afraid to be a voice in the wilderness. and all too often, we don't agree with dennis. but we always understood where his passion comes from. and it comes from his deep faith and the fact that he realy believes in america just as the rest of us do. but on a personal note, dennis has become a good friend of mine. we share a deep conviction about obesity in our nation and ways to conquer it. and who knows, maybe on the outside, we will work together to try to find solutions to that. to steve austria, who just stood at this podium. i got to know steve in the state legislature. while we didn't really work together on bill well, actually went to arizona to watch ohio state win its national championship and it was there that i realy got to know him and his wife on a personal level. it was there he shared with me his dream to one day serve in this congress. i'm so glad he was able to let that dream come true. to my good friend steve latourette. when you come as a special election you don't get this orientation that people get when they come as a class. you get elected and you're thrown on t
mag is something that is not needed. try taking a walk in the alaska wilderness and tell a grizzly bear that that the 44 is not needed. the three weapons were shown that this maniac had was a glock,ter , a high-end and a high-end sig sauer. anybody should have those under lock and key. and if they are in a state that has concealed carry, like here in oklahoma we have open carry, which i think is ridiculous. i am a correctional officer at and have been one for 20 years. i don't want a bad guy to know i have a weapon on me. i want to be able to protect the people that are in. whatever in like if i would've been there when gabrielle giffords was shot, it would not have been a little old lady to take the guy down. i would've been one of the first people sending sead his way -- lead his way. guest: thank you for calling. host: a tweet -- guest: i have no idea. if senator mcconnell comes on the show, maybe he will have an answer. host: does it help you as a congressman to have the republican leader from your state in the senate? guest: i don't think it is made any difference of our. ther
in the wilderness and he was the one that found a way to bring them into the majority in the house. how do you balance the pluses and minuses? >> there is not any question that that effort to paint a picture of jim wright's service laid the foundation for a majority. that was a healthy thing. i do not believe it was a good thing -- we have been in that for far too long. in turn, it is significant for the american public to know that appropriations committees work is where either you spend money or you do not. ideally, you are here to work with one another to be as responsive as possible to your own constituents and taxpayers. within the committee itself, the more we can talk to each other as individuals and human beings, the better off the institution will be. >> the kinds of organizations that track members' votes, when they look at yours, saw an ad and earlier you more frequently crossed the aisle to vote with democrats. in your later service, 96% rating. is that reflective -- you tell me. did the house change? >> it is a reflection of polarization that takes place at a leadership level. par
a bond company and they sold it to a bigger company. she went away into the wilderness. she's now founded her company again. >> she's men a plbeen a player while, significant in other own right. >> she's a remarkable woman. >> municipal bonds has everything to do with things we've been talking about in terms of financial health of the states, which is not great. you have to go state by state and make sure that you know what you're doing. you know, she's obviously the biggest proponent. i wish she'd start doing those commercials again. >> exactly. >> those things were so cool. iconic. >> they were. i love her. >> andy, you've come out with top picks from star investors. technology. >> these are, again, sort of out-of-the-box picks. align makes those invisible braces for your teeth. >> invisalign. >> i was thinking of getting those, yeah. >> and those things are really huge. pentair makes water filtration systems, obviously, you know, globally. that's an incredible business right now. water is a precious commodity. public storage is exactly what it sounds like, all those storage containers.
- term unemployment. secondly, there's clearly some immediate still a gap issues. you hear it in wilders, engineers, and we should be focused on that. third and perhaps most importantly, the long-term issue, which is really more, since we're talking about the future -- it is less of the current skills that and more of a supply-side issue. we should believe that if we have a large enough supply of skilled workers in the field of dreams notion that if we have the degree of skilled workers, it will help location of jobs to come here and we will be more of a magnet for the high skilled jobs of the future. i think that when we are looking at this, though, we should in our policy solutions make sure we are defining policies right said that we are having the right solutions. sometimes when people say "skill gaps, close to what they're talking about the absolute top of the top engineers and physicians. those people we talk about helping to address right now with high skilled immigration, others are talking about the supply of stem workers in our country -- science, technology, engineering, and m
that we should not be crying out in the wilderness to work, we have been sent here to work and we need to get down to it. in the final hours of this congress and we have the threat of working christmas, if we have to do it to get things done, i'm willing to do that, but the majority should help solve the nation's most pressing issue, that's why we're here. do not activelyhoose to leave the work unfinished. as we silt and wait for gos on the fissclaldeliff, the other -- there is other legislation that's ready that could be done now, could help our markets, relieve the mind of employer, could give security to the middle class and people below that and we certainly ought to be doing it. today's rule simply does the following. all we're doing now at this minute is we're giving the majority the freedom to spend the rest of this month and the rest of this year on minor, noncontroversial legislation. i refuse to give this blank check to a majority that has yet to show any interest in completing the outstanding work. i urge my colleagues to join me in opposing today's rule so we can try to get
'm sure he feels like he's a voice in the wilderness by doing that, but every single week each of us gets this special appeal from emanuel cleaver to be what we should be, stewards much our country and to do it in a way that does not demean our institution and demean each other and to advocate for what we believe, but to do it in a way that is more human and kind. i want to join with my colleagues in thanking him for his leadership, but most of all i want to thank him for the tremendous role model he has been for our institution to try to make our institution a better place in which to serve and to try to make each of us better members of this institution. i yield back, mr. chairman. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from massachusetts, mr. neal, for five minutes. mr. neal: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. neal: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, let me also thank reverend cleaver at his request i can't -- series of social security and spent the better part of two days with him and i got op
wilderness area. a -- an zend due to lack of maintenance would be devastating. it makes sense for the pipeline to use the existing roadbed for highway 2 in order to minimize the economic impact. my legislation simply solve this is government-made problem by allowing the national park service to allow maintenance on the pipeline. i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from the mariana islands is recognized. mr. sablan: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. sablan: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. sablan: h.r. 4606 clarifies that the national park service may issue right-of-way permits for a natural gas pipeline in glacier national park. the pipeline already exists. the senator introduced this legislation in march of this year. we do not object to this legislation and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from utah is recognized. mr. bishop: i have only myself as the
thing. both parties benefit by taking turns in the wilderness every now and then. over the past 10 years i have offered hundreds of amendments, privileged resolutions and points of order in this chamber. in fact, the vast majority of these offerings resulted in far more red marks next to members' names than green marks up on the wall above me. but i like to think that we, over time, made a difference and that this institution is better for it. in addition to my own capable staff, both here and in arizona, i want to thank those who staffed this chamber. from the floor staff who answered the leadership on both sides of the aisle, to the clerks, to the stenographers, to the parliamentarians who keep us operating within the rules, to the cloakroom staff who keep us fed and remind us when to vote. i found that there resides in all of these individuals an abiding love and deep respect for this institution. most of all i want to thank my family, my wife, sheryl, ryan, alexis, austin, tanner, and dallen. they have been supportive, patient and long suffering in dealing with a schedule that is any
house members have spent decades in the wilderness and he was the one that found a way to bring them into the majority in the house. how do you balance the pluses and minuses? >> there is not any question that that effort to paint a picture of jim wright's service laid the foundation for a majority. that was a healthy thing. i do not believe it was a good thing -- we have been in that for far too long. appropriations committees work -- in turn the, i think it is significant for the american public to know the appropriations committee work is where either you spend money or you do not. ideally, you are here to work with one another to be as responsive as possible to your own constituents and taxpayers. within the committee itself, the more we can talk to each other as individuals and human beings, the better off the institution will be. and the more responsive it will be. >> the kinds of organizations that track members' votes, when they look at yours, saw an ad and earlier you more frequently crossed the aisle to vote with democrats. in your later service, 96% rating. is that reflect
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)

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